Today’s paleo success…

To truly appreciate these coconut flour pancakes as a treat, you need to have followed a baking free Paleo plan for at least 2 weeks. They are perfect for topping with berries or bacon but will never be the same as drop scones from yesteryear when you frolicked freely with wheat flour and sugar!

 

Photo on 28-07-2014 at 15.37 #2

 

You will need:

1 x apple

1 x banana

4  x organic eggs

1 heaped tsp raw honey

1/2 tsp apple cider vinegar

2 tbsp coconut oil

30g coconut flour – I used Tiana

pinch of salt

1/2 tsp baking powder

1/2 tsp vanilla bean paste

 

How to:

Mash the banana in a bowl. Grate in the apple and add eggs, honey, apple cider vinegar, coconut oil and vanilla.

In a separate bowl, whisk together the coconut flour, salt, baking soda.

Slowly whisk the dry mix into the banana/apple mixture. Heat butter in a heavy pan over a medium heat. Spoon the batter into the pan to make 5 small pancakes at a time and cook thoroughly on each side. Serve with nut butter and berries or bacon and avocado (just omit the vanilla)

Vanilla American style pancakes

Vanilla American style pancakes

Beautiful texture, these pancakes are so quick to make; from craving to table in under 10 mins if everything is to hand.
Place a jug on your scales and set to zero. Add to the jug, 130g plain flour, 1 tsp baking powder, 3 tsp sugar/stevia blend – I used Tate & Lyle light at heart, 130ml milk, 1 large egg, 1 tsp good vanilla extract. whisk with a fork to a smooth batter and leave to stand for a couple of minutes.
Get a frying pan hot and melt a dot of butter for each batch of two small pancakes.
Pour two rounds of batter with a gap for spreading and when bubbles appear, flip over.
The little ones take only a minute or just over each side to be golden brown and fluffy in the middle.
Serve any way you wish, with more butter and honey, maple syrup and toasted walnuts, yoghurt and fresh berries, ice cream and chocolate sauce, banana slices and cream…..the possibilities with these pillows of deliciousness are endless.
Enjoy being adored by your family, you’ve never been so popular!

Pancakelava

Pancakelava

Whilst I truly believe there are few greater pleasures in February than a pancake on Shrove Tuesday adorned simply with fresh lemon juice and generous smattering of caster sugar, I do like to play with toppings for the subsequent pancakes – noone in this family ever has just one!
This year, I melted Green and Blacks milk chocolate and rolled the children’s pancakes with mini marshmallows ala Rocky Road, a triumph. My children left the table covered in chocolate and beaming on a sugar high! For my husbands palette however I had to put more thought in, never one for puddings I was determined to have him waxing lyrical about my pancakes…..
We both love pistachios, so I simply smashed some, toasted them in a sauté pan, stirred through honey and spice (cardamom and rose work well) and plonked generously atop a fresh pancake complete with a dollop of greek yoghurt. Husband liked and ate the lot, quite the compliment and I will make pancakelava again as it delivered all the syrupy naughtiness of baklava without the hassle of fiddling with filo.

Love it or Hate it….

Love it or Hate it....

Marmite, in pancakes – duvet deep scotch pancakes to be precise with a delicate savouriness that appealed to the whole family. The recipe comes from The Fabulous Baker Brothers: Glorious British Grub book.
I have been the proud owner of this cook book since the launch of the Hobbs House Cookery School and yet this morning was my first time making these and they really are quite special.
Faced with an empty bread bin as well as an empty tummy craving buttered toast and marmite, my go-to kitchen favourite gave me the answer and because they were so good, one can only recommend you go out and get this book https://www.headline.co.uk/Articles/the+fabulous+baker+brothers.page
or at the very least, visit this page for the recipe. Sure to become a family favourite and yes, next time I will serve with sweet onion chutney and good sausages as the Herberts suggest.